Torque Cars

Double de-clutching

Discussion in 'General car Chat' started by obi_waynne, 19 January 2007.

  1. obi_waynne

    obi_waynne Administrator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    41,343
    From:
    Deal, Kent UK
    Car:
    A3 1.4 TFSI 150 COD
    Do you double de-clutch or do heel and toe gearshifts? Does is make the car faster, smoother or more fun to drive? Any other tips or ideas for a better gearchange.
     
  2. BAD63R

    BAD63R Authorised Trader

    Messages:
    1,551
    From:
    Cornwall
    Car:
    MG TF135
    If i'm having a race I usually power change, as in keep ya foot welded on the accelerator and just use the clutch. You have to be very fast at changing gear but it works a treat as long as you don't miss a gear. I've tried double clutching and it seems a bit dangerous for the clutch and bearings so I stick to the power change.
     
  3. vr1066

    vr1066 Torque Junkie

    Messages:
    162
    From:
    Edinburgh
    could you explain the term "double de-clutch" please, it's not a term I've heard before. ta.
     
  4. BAD63R

    BAD63R Authorised Trader

    Messages:
    1,551
    From:
    Cornwall
    Car:
    MG TF135
    You know when you pull off really quick or accidently hold the clutch a bit too long and you can feel the extra boost from the engine as you're pushing it more with the clutch. Well as far as I remember double de-clutch is to do with that. Basically you give yourself extra power when changing and you don't lose your revs.


    IIRC that is pmsl.

    Granny shifting is another word for it.
     
  5. obi_waynne

    obi_waynne Administrator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    41,343
    From:
    Deal, Kent UK
    Car:
    A3 1.4 TFSI 150 COD
    Double de-clutch:-
    1st Gear to 2nd gear - Clutch down gear to neutral, clutch up still in neutral - set throttle to match transmission speed to engine rpm which is a little lower that before when changing up, clutch down then select second gear.

    Going down a gear is much the same but you need to increase the engine speed. And some drivers will blip the throttle with their heel while braking with their toe to achieve this.

    When you get good this takes as little time as a conventional gear change and maintains very smooth and progressive power delivery.

    On modern cars with syncromesh some people argue that the DDC is no longer of value and others say that it is what proper drivers on a track do.

    Why do it - its much smoother - when cornering at 100+ on a track a typical rough gearchange could upset the balance of a car.

    On a drag strip where you just want to get the car to the top speed then the power change has a place but you still risk wheelspin and loss of traction with this brutal method.

    I'm just really interested in the debate as to wether this method still has value today. I feel that it does on the track and it is a habit you can learn on the open road.
     
  6. vr1066

    vr1066 Torque Junkie

    Messages:
    162
    From:
    Edinburgh
    Thanks for the info, this is stuff I need to know.

    Sometimes I feel like I'm not driving my car properly. I'd just like to know I'm driving my car to it's full potential on the road (not full speed).
     
  7. obi_waynne

    obi_waynne Administrator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    41,343
    From:
    Deal, Kent UK
    Car:
    A3 1.4 TFSI 150 COD
    It takes lots of practice but feels so good when you get it right particularly when your needle is reaching the RED ZONE! :lol:

    Practice at low revs first though...
     
  8. HDi fun

    HDi fun TC ModFather

    Messages:
    15,384
    From:
    Buckinghamshire UK
    Car:
    Passat 2.0 TDi
    I still use the DD technique on the way down the box. As for upchanging, waste of time. Power changing is fine but can shred clutches and tyres. Go for a decent 6 or 7 speed auto if you really want continuous power delivery.
     
  9. thexav

    thexav Pro Tuner Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,045
    Car:
    2002 Clio 172
    dont you have to double clutch on dog tooth straight cut boxes anyway?
     
  10. obi_waynne

    obi_waynne Administrator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    41,343
    From:
    Deal, Kent UK
    Car:
    A3 1.4 TFSI 150 COD
    The dog tooth gears and straight cut gears are less forgiving of bad changes so double clutching although not vital will help to smooth things out and make the box last a bit longer.

    A new article on de clutching is live on the main site:-http://www.torquecars.com/articles/double-de-clutching.php
     
    Last edited: 7 March 2011
  11. vr1066

    vr1066 Torque Junkie

    Messages:
    162
    From:
    Edinburgh
    Nice article man, now I just got to practise.

    Keep up the great work.
     
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