Going organic - ?...

HuntingTarg

Tuner
Points
52
From
Cali USA
Car
'02 Kia Spectra LS
Something new has crossed my path. I just read a couple product descriptions describing organic brake pad/shoe material. I learned a little about this but don't remember anything specific. Is organic material in any way superior to ceramic? I saw a se of organic mat'l. pads thst were TWICE the price of matching ceramic pads.
 

obi_waynne

Administrator
Staff member
Moderator
Points
887
From
Deal, Kent UK
Car
A3 1.4 TFSI 150 COD
Friction and heat dissipation are what counts here. Imo you're better off fitting bigger discs and pads etc rather than going for a fancy compound. You'll also save money in most cases.
 

HDi fun

TC ModFather
Points
637
From
Buckinghamshire UK
Car
Passat 2.0 TDi
It's nothing to do with organic as in the way food is marketed as organic. Organic simply means carbon derived content. It's not new. Metals and ceramics are frequently incorporated in pad material formulations along with resins (again carbon material).
 

HuntingTarg

Tuner
Points
52
From
Cali USA
Car
'02 Kia Spectra LS
Friction and heat dissipation are what counts here. Imo you're better off fitting bigger discs and pads etc rather than going for a fancy compound. You'll also save money in most cases.
It is if all you're concerned with is braking performance. Larger rotors increase the rotational inertia on the wheel assembly, which will affect acceleration and mileage. Not to a huge degree, but most things are trade-offs rather than true improvements.
 

HuntingTarg

Tuner
Points
52
From
Cali USA
Car
'02 Kia Spectra LS
It's nothing to do with organic as in the way food is marketed as organic. Organic simply means carbon derived content. It's not new. Metals and ceramics are frequently incorporated in pad material formulations along with resins (again carbon material).
We know, it's a bit of cheek.
So what makes 'organic' pads perform (and apparently cost) better than common graphite carbon pads? Is it a blending of materials?
 
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