Toyota Supra Tuning guide.

"A Supra Power"

The Toyota Supra must be classed among one of the most reliable sports cars released by a modern car manufacturer.

It was produced in the 1993 and the last of the models rolled off the production line in 1996.

The twin turbo engine produces 327 BHP and pushes the car to 60 miles per hour in just 4.9 seconds.

Originally the Toyota engineers designed the engine to produce a massive 600 brake horsepower.  Executives however bowed to market forces and cut the power back to almost half its originally intended level.  This ensured reliability and better fuel economy.

It also means that the engine is over machined effectively making it bulletproof. TorqueCars expect to see power gains upto 700bhp before having to get the engine machined and toughened up.

 

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Designed for 600bhp Toyota reduced the power due to market forces leaving a tuners dream.

Fuel economy is not the major concern of a Toyota Supra over as the car will typically return around 20 miles to the gallon and use a set of rear tires every few months!

Handling/Suspension upgrades

Improving the handling for people first priority in your Supra tuning project.

If you set the toe out to around 1.5 degrees on the front, and add a little negative camber then cornering will dramatically improve.

Drop the car by as much as 30mm - 42 mm. and fit uprated stiffer dampers, bigger drops will need other modifications in most instances.

Traction is probably the biggest problem affecting the Toyota Supra.  A softer compound tire will certainly help.  And many owners fit wider rims so there is a greater contact area with the ground. See our wheels and tire articles for more information on this.

Power mods.

The beauty of the Toyota Supra is the simplicity required to exact high power gains.  The combination of a boost controller and remap will raise the power to 400 to 500 BHP.  At these power levels you will benefit from the cold air induction kit and full sports exhaust.

These mods mods are usually installed by our members, decide how far you want to go before you get started.

Getting the correct grade of motorsport parts for your planned usage of the car is vital. Stage 3 (competition) mods just won't work well on the road making the car difficult to drive.

Stage 1 mods: Remap, Suspension upgrade (drop 30mm - 42 mm.), Lighter flywheel, Panel air filter, Alloy wheels, Sports exhaust.

Stage 2 mods: fuel pump upgrades, Fast road cam, Ported and polished head, high flow fuel injector, Power/Sport clutch.

Stage 3 mods: Sports gearbox, Engine balancing, Competition cam, Adding or upgrading forced induction (turbo/supercharger), Internal engine upgrades (pistons/head/valves).

Peak power is good on competition cars but for a daily driven car you need a wide power band and perhaps extending the rev range.

In this article we shall give your a good starting base to the best upgrades for your car, but we'd encourage you to spend some time on the site looking into the details of each type of performance upgrade.A fast road camshaft is widely accepted as one of the best NASP power modifications you can do mechanically to your engine.

It improves the intake and exhaust durations and increases the power if done right. Ideally you'd add other mods and finish up with a remap. TorqueCars would caution you not to go with a motor sport cam as this affects the engines idling and general town driving characteristics.

Don't forget to increase the fuelling when you are increasing the power - it makes the car more thirsty.

Using high octane fuel is another option if you find you are suffering from pinking or premature ignition on your Toyota project after fitting other uprated parts. Improving the injectors is another beneficial modification and will deliver sufficient fuel.

A fuel pump will only deliver a finite amount of fuel, so you may need to uprate this if your injectors are demanding more fuel.

Intake and Exhaust Tuning.

There is much debate as to whether a large turbo conversion or work on the existing twin turbo set up will produce the best power gains.

Certainly for drag racing where sheer peak power is important a large turbo seems to be the way to go. The lag of a large turbo can actually help to reign in power for the launch and let the car come on boost as it starts moving.

You also have the option of a large twin turbo set up and boost controller to smooth the power delivery and help compensate for lag. Or why not mix and match have a preliminary small turbo then feed in a larger turbo for the best of both worlds.

Now we move on to the intake and exhaust and ensure proper flow through the engine.  Contrary to popular belief there is generally a small power gain reached by fitting an induction kit, they only become beneficial and are recommended after you boost the engines power to the point where the standard air intake box cannot cope!

Induction kits can work well on turbo engines and larger engines (if supplied with a suitable cold air feed or air box), generally though we'd just recommend for Supra engines you should just fit a sports panel air filter preferably made from cotton.

Sports exhausts will certainly help air flow through the engine but avoid an exhaust that is too wide or you could will reduce the flow rate. Stick to 1.5 to 2.5 inches as a rule of thumb.

Getting a professionally ported and polished head with larger valves can fully maximise your power gains. In nearly all cases of Supra tuning your clutch will start to complain and this needs to be uprated - read our overview on clutches for more information. The best mods that we recommend for your Supra are Remapping or piggy back ecu, fast road cam and air intake and exhaust.

Remaps offer massive power gains on all turbo charged cars. On NASP engines the benefits are doubtful. However a flashed ecu on a NASP engine will help unleash the potential if you have done a lot of mods.

We've also seen some tuners experimenting with twin charging conversions and making some seriously high power figures.

Adding forced induction will see big power gains but this is usually too expensive to be cost effective. It is usually easier to bolt on a supercharger than it is to fit a working turbo. It is difficult to map fuelling with a turbo as the boost comes on exponentially with revs.

It is simpler to map a supercharger because the boost is correlating to engine speed on a linear curve. Alternatively you could perhaps fit water injection to cut down knock.

Alloy wheel upgrades.

As alloys are lighter they improve performance and they help to cool the brake disks. We can't go into too much detail here about tires but they are how the car puts the power down on the road so are a critical choice. directional tread pattern tires work well on Supra, and make a big difference over budget tires. The downside to large alloy wheels on your Supra is that you're altering your final drive ratio and this will have a detrimental effect on acceleration and performance.

Due to this try to keep the overall rolling diameter of the wheel the standard factory sizes. In all cases we do not recommend going above 18 inches.

For more information on Tuning your car please join us in our friendly forum where you can discuss Supra options in more detail with our Supra owners. It would also be worth reading our unbiased Toyota tuning articles to get a full grasp of the benefits and drawbacks of each modification.

Please help us improve these tips by sending us your feedback in the comments box below.

We love to hear what our visitors have got up to and which mods work best for them on each model of car. Comments are used to improve the accuracy of these articles which are continually updated.

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2 Responses to “Tuning the Toyota Supra”

  1. TorqueCars says:

    What mods have you done to your Supra? What mods work best, which were the most disappointing and what mods have you got planned for the future? Please share your tips.

  2. Liam Little says:

    Can u remap the factory ecu on a 95 toyota supra twin turbo



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