Torque Cars

Which gives better fuel consumption in an auto gear?

Discussion in 'Technical forum' started by badaveil, 17 August 2013.

  1. badaveil

    badaveil Wrench Pro

    Messages:
    34
    From:
    Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
    Car:
    Peugeot 407
    Often one makes comparison in fuel consumption between a manual and automatic gearbox but here, I wish to know in cars with automatic gearbox that can shift between automatic and manual setting, which delivers better fuel consumption assuming both are driven in the same driving style? :confused:
     
    Last edited: 17 August 2013
  2. HDi fun

    HDi fun TC ModFather

    Messages:
    15,384
    From:
    Buckinghamshire UK
    Car:
    Passat 2.0 TDi
    If they're driven in the same style there will be no difference.
     
  3. badaveil

    badaveil Wrench Pro

    Messages:
    34
    From:
    Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
    Car:
    Peugeot 407
    Technically, why is that so when they are different? :confused:
     
  4. HDi fun

    HDi fun TC ModFather

    Messages:
    15,384
    From:
    Buckinghamshire UK
    Car:
    Passat 2.0 TDi
    Do you mean automatic cars with torque converters compared to manual cars with mechanical clutches. If so then the manual car will generally give slightly better economy.

    But you did mention automatic car driven with the driver selecting gears manually. And in that case there will be no difference to speak of.

    I answered the question you asked.
     
  5. T9 man

    T9 man TC Pro Founder Moderator

    Messages:
    20,369
    From:
    London, UK
    Car:
    Saab 9-3SS T9
    I think I see what the OP is asking HDi - Badaveil - There would be no discernible difference between the fuel consumption on a standard automatic gearbox and an automatic gearbox with a manual shift selector. I have the fancy tiptronic version and although it is great to use on a track and occasionally on the motorway, for everyday use you use the full automatic facility of the gearbox. If you use the autobox in manual mode then you do run the risk of using more fuel simply because YOU are selecting when to shift change up and down through the gears, therefore you will be shifting outside the programmed criteria of the autobox controller or TCS.
     
  6. badaveil

    badaveil Wrench Pro

    Messages:
    34
    From:
    Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
    Car:
    Peugeot 407
    Yes, yes. I mean the auto gearbox with the so-called "tiptronic" thing. So when you mean 'autobox in manual mode', you meant in "triptronic" mode? :embarrest:
     
  7. HDi fun

    HDi fun TC ModFather

    Messages:
    15,384
    From:
    Buckinghamshire UK
    Car:
    Passat 2.0 TDi
    I have a Tiptronic 6 speed unit too. BMW calls it Steptronic - it has all sorts of clever sub modes (BMW calls this Adaptive Automatic Transmission) left to itself like inhibiting changes when the car is taking tight bends and not changing up on long hill descents but it's the same thing.

    But surely if I am driving in the same style then I'd be changing up and down at roughly the same points as the ECU would choose anyway. Which constitutes the same driving style! So economy would be nearly enough identical!
     
    badaveil likes this.
  8. badaveil

    badaveil Wrench Pro

    Messages:
    34
    From:
    Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
    Car:
    Peugeot 407
    Yes, I see and agree with your point. So does that mean the triptronic mode should not be used if a driver has fuel economy in mind? :blink:
     
  9. HDi fun

    HDi fun TC ModFather

    Messages:
    15,384
    From:
    Buckinghamshire UK
    Car:
    Passat 2.0 TDi
    Not really, it's only there if you want to take control of the gear changes yourself.

    After a few weeks with an adaptive transmission it learns your driving style to a degree and also you, as the driver, learn how to influence its behaviour by adjusting accelerator pedal pressure slightly.

    I use the Tip/Step mode occasionally but in general I find normal automatic gives enough response for my needs. It does adapt in lots of ways. If you push the accelerator down rapidly it will instantly engage one from a number of performance oriented gear change patterns. This is different to normal kickdown operation.

    You can also manually select a Sport program which tightens up the torque converter and holds lower gears for longer. The shifts also tend to be slightly 'firmer' in sport program whereas in normal the shifts are virtually impossible to feel at all.

    A good automatic transmission can be a joy to drive in all kinds of situations. A bad one can be very very annoying and even dangerous.
     
    badaveil likes this.
  10. badaveil

    badaveil Wrench Pro

    Messages:
    34
    From:
    Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
    Car:
    Peugeot 407
    A very good and interesting reply. I will keep them in mind. Thank you very much
     
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