Lowering pitfalls

TCJBOLDIE

Torque King
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I see quite a number of road cars lowered / slammed with sometimes 5+ degrees of negative camber that to me seems dangerous as the suspension has been stiffened to help prevent bottoming out over bumps due to reduced suspension movement as well as being unable to drive over speed bumps without scraping the underbody or exhaust all due to the thing called "stance" and being or looking "cool" by the younger generation BUT I wonder just how many have had the roll centre and bump steer problems due to excessive lowering rectified ?

You may need to read the link if you are unaware as to what I am talking about.

http://www.whiteline.com.au/roll_ce...MIkf6z9I_14wIVBg4rCh3arwOZEAMYASAAEgKPFPD_BwE

http://www.whiteline.com.au/product_detail4.php?part_number=KCA435&sans_vehicle=1
 

obi_waynne

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I quite agree, so many young lads think rock hard springs, super low ride height and extreme camber is a good thing.

Motorsports cars generally run on a very flat surface and the drive is not concerned with potholes, speed bumps or comfort. Motorsport settings do not translate for the road at all.

Drifters tend to use extreme camber to encourage the front to dig and allow directional changes more quickly. This doesn't IMO improve the cars handling unless you want to be drifting everywhere.

Suspension is a complex area and only the well informed should start to play with it.
 

TCJBOLDIE

Torque King
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From
Brisbane
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JB Starion
While camber may look and be considered cool by the lads/boy racers and posers.

The sole purpose of having negative camber on say the front is that when being cornered hard the loaded outer tyre that will be doing say 80%+ of the work will be as square to the road for max grip and not rolling over onto the sidewall BUT the downside for a road car is poor mileage and accelerated wear wear on the inner 1/2 of the tyre as it will spend most of it's life being driven in a straight line.

Tyre life can be extended by having the tyres reversed on the rims.
 
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TCJBOLDIE

Torque King
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From
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Unless they have a directional tread of course!


Sorry I must disagree .V( I think you were thinking about asymmetric tyres that can or should only be fitted with the "outside' mark on the outside directional tyres generally do not have outside on them.:)

What I was recommending was removing tyres from the both front wheels and refitting them with the inner negative camber worn 1/2 of the tread to the outside of the wheels so they will still be rolling in the same direction.|B

When refitting the wheels & tyres install what was the front passenger side tyre over to the driver side and vice versa so the rolling direction of a directional tyre remains the same :)
 
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obi_waynne

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Sorry - wrong term, yes Assymetric tyres was what I was thinking of!

And yes that makes sense swapping the tyres around, not just the rims, which would reverse them.
 
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