Torque Cars

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

    Learn More.
  2. Dismiss Notice

Basic guide to changing brake pads

Discussion in 'DIY tips & guides' started by gendox, 25 August 2009.

  1. gendox

    gendox Track Warrior

    Messages:
    607
    From:
    Corby, Nortants
    Car:
    Pug 206 LX
    Ok, so i changed my pads after a very needed change, was left late as i get one day off a week and some theives stole my pads from the box in car, so had to wait another week to get it done.

    Ok, Step 1:
    Get car on a flat smooth surface gravel is not advised as jack could slip, undo wheel nuts slightly and jack up on relevent jacking point under car

    [​IMG]

    Step 2:
    Loosen and remove bolts from wheel in a criss cross formation.

    [​IMG]

    Step 3:
    Put removed wheel under suspension and disks for added security.

    [​IMG]

    Step 4:
    Next turn steering wheel so the back of the caliper is more visible

    [​IMG]

    Step 5:
    Loosen & remove bolt from rear of caliper (some cars you may have to loosen top one too)

    [​IMG]

    Step 6:
    On my pug they reccomend changing the bolt.

    [​IMG]

    Step 7:
    Next lift caliper being carfull not to strain the flexi hose holding the brake fluid & remove old pads (check for uneven wear or damage to pads & disk, uneven wear could be a result of a sticking piston)

    [​IMG]

    Step 8:
    Check new pads with old pads to make sure they are the right fit.

    [​IMG]

    Step 9:
    Fit the new pads into the housing becarful not to damage the pad or rub dirt on the disk.

    [​IMG]

    Step 10:
    Push the piston back into the calpier be carful on rare occasions this can damage the reservoir.

    [​IMG]

    Step 11:
    Pop caliper down screw new bolt in and put the wheel on simpels.

    [​IMG]


    there is a few other things you can do like give the calipers a good scrubbing to get rid of rust also add some brake grease to the piston (carfull not to get on disk) also you can clean the disk after changing brakes to get rid of grease and dirt.

    Oh and i will be changing them disks tomorrow, i know there bad couldnt be helped, ill pop up a step by step for that.

    edit i accept no resposibility for any damage done to your own vehicle and this is only a basic guide
     
    Last edited: 26 August 2009
    obi_waynne likes this.
  2. pgarner

    pgarner TC ModFather Moderator

    Messages:
    16,522
    From:
    Lockerbie, SW Scotland
    Car:
    Octy smoke machine
    couple of points before winding back the piston open the resivior cap so the fluid has less pressure against it - this has less chance of damaging the seals.

    copperslip (high temp grease) goes on the BACK of the pads and on the caliper.

    and if you dont know what your doing as someone who does to watch you. looks and is easy to change pads and discs


    also gendex edit your post to say that you acept no resposibility for any damage done to your own vehicle this is a basic guide etc etc etc
     
  3. gendox

    gendox Track Warrior

    Messages:
    607
    From:
    Corby, Nortants
    Car:
    Pug 206 LX
    cheers for the heads up i know about the copper grease and stuff but didnt want to go into to much detail just a couple of steps gonna spray my rims soon so ill do one for that if you all want.
     
  4. MasterAuron

    MasterAuron Very Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,117
    From:
    379bhp 359lbft
    Car:
    Mk1 Focus RS
    Can we sticky this please oh great mods?
     
  5. turbonutter69

    turbonutter69 TC ModFather Moderator

    Messages:
    18,932
    From:
    Alone in the dark.
    Car:
    Insignia SRI.
  6. Skullion

    Skullion Torque Junkie

    Messages:
    202
    From:
    Dundee, Scotland
    Car:
    Celica GT
    Couple Pointer Not Nick Picking......

    .....Trolley jack should never be jacked up on the Sill, as these are only made for Sissor jacks.

    And don't wear bright white trainers and hold the wheel due to Getting your trainers marked or crushing your feet if jack fails

    but good guide :p
     
  7. pgarner

    pgarner TC ModFather Moderator

    Messages:
    16,522
    From:
    Lockerbie, SW Scotland
    Car:
    Octy smoke machine
    alot of trolley jacks have the grooves cut into them for this purpose. id never use a scissor jack for this type of things
     
  8. Skullion

    Skullion Torque Junkie

    Messages:
    202
    From:
    Dundee, Scotland
    Car:
    Celica GT
    Just from Experince, i've seen it happen a few times. Guy had a ford mondo and his sills were reinforced so he always jacked it from the sill using a Trolley jack.....However through time the sill went on it, ...... When using a trolley jack, your best place is right on the chassis or jacking point's located in the manual
     
  9. paultsport

    paultsport Wrench Pro

    Messages:
    25
    From:
    chester uk
    Car:
    Toyota Celica t spo
    thanks for the how to and pics this'll be a great help in a couple of weeks when my t sport celica gets new pads :)
     
  10. gummy

    gummy Torque Master

    Messages:
    976
    From:
    england heathfield
    Car:
    skyline r34 gtt
    A good imformative thread! but not all pads fit the same so anyone changing should check first!.
     
  11. TCJBOLDIE

    TCJBOLDIE Torque King

    Messages:
    4,395
    From:
    Brisbane
    Car:
    JB Starion
    Better late than never.
    If you have multi piston calipers you DO NOT have to remove the calipers
    The pads slip in from the top BUT you still have to wind/press the pistons back to install new pads.Other than that follow the OP's detailed instructions.
     
  12. Bakute

    Bakute Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    From:
    Italy
    Car:
    Peugeot 206
    Hi!
    Thanks for sharing this guide. I have noticed that you have an old type of caliper. (The new one if i’m not mistaken has 2 female torx screws, T55 i think). We have the same type on my 206 but the pads of mine have holes on both ends, each with inserted cylindrical springs, but you used that with flat or the leaf springs. Do they fit the same, talking about the safety?
    May i know your VIS if you don’t mind? That is the last 8 digits of your VIN). I think your original pad is the same with mine.
    Thanks...
     
    Last edited: 13 July 2018
  13. TCJBOLDIE

    TCJBOLDIE Torque King

    Messages:
    4,395
    From:
    Brisbane
    Car:
    JB Starion
    When replacing worn pads you should remove the cap from the master cylinder reservoir
    as when the piston is forced back the fluid returns and it may overflow so if it is full you may need to drain off some fluid first. Don't forget to top up the fluid and replace the cap when finished.

    You can also open the bleed nipple and that will fluid will allow it to drain away when the piston is being forced back into the caliper to make room for the thicker new pads to be fitted.

    IMO this method allows the piston to move back easier and has the added benefit of removing the hardest working fluid to be replaced with fresher fluid that has not been subjected to as much heat as the fluid immediately behind the piston.

    Check and top up the fluid if needed and refit cap.

    I would highly recommend that all the calipers be bled at this time and in the correct order starting with the one farthermost from the master cylinder.
    1 Passenger rear
    2 Driver rear
    3 Passenger front
    4 Driver front
    every time pads are changed

    Important IMO you must/ should go for a drive to help bed in the pads to discs.

    You should also check the discs/rotors for wear and cracking have them skimmed if there is uneven wear plus measure the thickness to ensure that they are still thicker than the minimum thickness that will require complete replacement of the discs.

    IMO one should always fit new pads with new discs

    FWIW I drive to a safe place with little or no traffic and do 8 -10 reasonably hard stops but not locking wheels from app 80 kph down to app 20kph.

    I know that some pads state that bedding in is not needed BUT I would still do it in an effort to ensure that the full contact area of the pad contacts the disc to ensure that the car does not pull to one side and tracks straight when braking.

    PS most cars have sliding calipers where there is only 1 piston so you must also lubricate the mechanism/pin it slides on for smooth operation.

    DISCLAIMER That is what I would do BUT take no responsibility whatsoever for your actions or any injuries or damages that may result from any one or to anyone or to any property due following my advise in any way shape or form and highly advise that if you are unsure as to your level of skill, competence or ability to carry out the pad change correctly as shown in the workshop manual for your car then for your and every bodies safety IMO you should have a suitably qualified mechanical workshop do the work for you.
     
    Last edited: 14 July 2018
Loading...

Share This Page

Click Here